James Gunn Hints a Character May Have Survived The Suicide Squad

While James Gunn warned us not to get too attached to any of the characters in The Suicide Squad, there was no way fans wouldn’t get attached to some of those who died early on.

Despite being warned, it was still a bit of a shock that so early on, within 10 minutes or so, that many of the villains turned anti-heroes were killed off. It was a great scene, one of many in Gunn’s first DCEU project, with plenty of visceral gore.

During last week’s virtual watch party, Gunn revealed one of those deaths may not have been an actual death. He reminds fans, a fact that I missed in my viewing, that Nathan Fillion’s character, TDK aka The Detachable Kid, isn’t actually dead.

Fillion commented on his director friend’s tweet, while not surprised at Gunn’s revelation, he did seem surprised when he first watched The Suicide Squad:

As noted during our roundtable discussion, TDK is very similar to Arm-Fall-Off-Boy. Despite their similarities, TDK is technically an original character. His powers, for those that need reminding, are being able to detach his arms and control them while off his body. It’s one of the more unique powers. Fillion has previously talked about the creation of TDK, saying:

My participation in the invention of the character kind of went like this. James saying, “Here’s how it’s going to go”, and me saying, “That sounds good”. That’s what I call dissipation.

On taking on the role of TDK, Fillion said:

I take a lot of credit. It’s all about the function of the character in the story. What is his function in the story? TDK’s abilities, for me, clearly spelled out his function and I got it. I know exactly what you need. I know what you’re looking for and I know what you want. Boom. Let’s do this. I get it.

The Suicide Squad is currently in theaters until its Blu-Ray release on October 26th.

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Source: ComicBook.com


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